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  1. #1
    Registered User pinfante's Avatar
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    pinfante is offline

    Breaking into the fitness industry?

    Got a question, ill try to get to the point as quick as possible...

    So I am kind of semi-retired I guess im 42 and had an auto repair business for 15 years that I just sold becuase iv had some investments pay off and I dont really have to work to maintain my same level of quality of life. Not that im rich and hit the lottery. Normal middle class guy who values freedom and time over being ultra wealthy. I built a great auto repair company and truth is I never really loved the business its just that selling auto repairs and having a complete and total understanding of how a car works on an engineering level is what I was very good at. Long story short its never been my passion, I enjoy fitness my whole life. And since I really don't "need" the money I want to get into the fitness industry. I have a very great understanding of writing programs, diet, training, pharmacology, blood work, and supplementation. etc... I dont wanna brag, believe me, but im in fantastic shape, so i look the part, probably in the top 1% of all 42 year old males, most people are shocked when they find out im 40 but even my father who is 65 looks like hes 50 so genetics play a role into it. I wanna make a "job" out of fitness I just dont know where to start or what those options are. Like I said the money isnt that important right now. I certainly dont wanna teach granny how to exercise but id love to work with intermediates or advance lifters on a coaching/ advisory level or find another way to make a career from just generally being in shape. Id love some input if someone could be so kind to offer some suggestions or insight.

    Thank you.
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  2. #2
    NASM-CPT xsquid99's Avatar
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    xsquid99 is offline
    I'm 47 and like you I have another full time day job career outside of fitness. I decided just this year to break into doing some part time fitness after spending the last 5-6 years really getting into it. My situation is a little unique because I work on a U.S. military base in my day job, and we have two gyms on base that are always in need of personal trainers so I became a part time contractor through them. The good thing is it that I have total freedom to take on as many clients as I want and choose my own hours, and basically have no boss to report to since I'm operating as an independent contractor. The rates are controlled by the gym administration since I'm using their facility, and they take a cut, but I'm not in this for the money at all so that part doesn't matter to me. Its pretty much the perfect situation for me right now while I build up my skills as a trainer and learn how to deal with and coach people of all different ages, body types, personalities, etc.

    I will tell you this, without that piece of paper from a recognized certification agency or some type of degree in health/fitness its really tough, if not impossible, to get started at any facility that you don't actually own. And you will generally need this cert/degree to obtain liability insurance to operate as a trainer. I got my cert through NASM because it was one of the most widely recognized, but there are lots of others as well. Once you have your cert you could go many different directions, you could cut your teeth by working at a local gym or YMCA, and then branch out from there, or you could try to create your own business/brand, but you're either going to need clients who have their own private home gym or work an agreement to use someone else's facility (which you will have to pay for). You may have to start out by taking clients outside your target demographic, and from my experience this is actually a great way to improve your coaching because you will be required to think outside of the box.

    If you're interested in targeting intermediates or advanced level lifters then you should visit a local gym that targets that demographic (not "Planet Fitness"), and start going there, get to know people that work there and other customers, show your face a lot and build a reputation with them and THEN maybe approach someone about employment or coaching opportunities.
    IG: @ironhousetraining

    All it takes is consistency, effort, proper nutrition, good programming, and TIME.

    Don't be upset with the results you didn't get from the work you did not do.
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