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  1. #1
    Registered User sledgurl's Avatar
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    Lifter's with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    I need some advice in regards to continued lifting... A little quick dialog about things. 8 years ago, I was in a really serious ATV accident; almost losing my leg. 5 surgeries, and permanent nerve damage. Diagnosed several years later with CRPS 2 - Complex Regional Pain Syndrome.

    About 4 years ago, I felt like I might have RA, had the test, but they came back negative. In the meantime, I was told I had carpal tunnel & basal thumb arthritis, so I was referred to a rheumatologist. Diagnosed with trauma related fibromyalgia at that point. All my joints where getting worse, had x-rays, and other tests, and I was finally diagnosed with RA. I have been working out, but when COVID hit, gyms closed, and I had no where to continue the weights. Lost a lot of muscle mass, which caused saggy skin, even though I'm thin☹️. Got a used smith machine and started back about 6 months ago.

    With the condition of my leg, it's absolutely vital I lift weights, to place the stress on my tibia, to force the bone to remodel bone. When I'm no having bad flares I lift and I've gotten back in shape, not as big as I was,

    I'm having a lot of difficulties with my RA. Because things are so advance, I am experiencing a lot of pain, and many flares. I'm forcing myself to continue working out, but now, it seems if I try pushing myself... I end up with a flare, lasting days. The hobbies I love doing, and I'm good at, I can hardly participate. I read, you have to be careful not to over do things. I've read other females with RA, that are competing. I see other athletes able to do what they are good at, and still have RA.

    I want, and know I absolutely must continue working out. My tibia is slowly dying, but working out basically is extending the health of the bone. It's also a proven fact, working out is helpful when dealing with chronic pain. Even when you don't have chronic pain issues, it's a must to workout, for continued health.

    I am wondering if others also having RA, and how are you able to know when your pushing yourself too much? But wanting to continue training to gain more strength, and muscle mass?

    Sorry for a long-winded question. I appreciate any thoughts, and/or ideas.
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  2. #2
    Registered User nitefeatherz's Avatar
    Join Date: Mar 2014
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    I don't have RA. I have PsA. They are similar though. I also have a long laundry list of orthopedic issues along with the chronic joint pain and lethargy that comes with an autoimmune mediated issue.

    I try to eat organic. Anything processed seems to trigger a flare. (Fruit, veggies, whole proteins). I'm also on immune suppressants from my rheumatologist along with an NSAID that I use when the pain is out of control.

    I was also overweight and made it a point to lose enough body fat that I was no longer overweight which made a big difference as well.

    It took about a year for the immune suppression drugs to kick in fully.
    "We gain strength, and courage, and confidence by each experience in which we really stop to look fear in the face... we must do that which we think we cannot." Eleanor Roosevelt
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