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    When Bodyweight Isn't Enough

    When Bodyweight Isn't Enough - Three Easy Ways to Add Weight to Dips & Pullups

    Most people start out doing dips and pullups on a machine that takes weight away from their body and gives them assistance. Once they've built enough strength, they move away from the machine and hit the dip bars and pullup bar to do reps with their bodyweight. Using your own bodyweight for dips and pullups is a great goal and you're stronger than average if you make it to that point. However, what comes next? Another level definitely exists!

    The next level involves adding weight to your body so you can progress past your bodyweight. Since there is no machine that instantly adds weight to your body, I'm going to teach you three ways to do it.

    1. The Dip Belt - This is the easiest method and it involves using a belt that wraps around your waist or hangs off of your hips. The belt has a chain connected to it and you thread that chain through weight plates or hang a dumbbell in the chain. Wearing the belt with weight attached to it adds weight to your body and you're ready to go!

    This video illustrates the dip belt method:

    2. The Dumbbell Behind the Knee Method - You won't see many people doing this, but it works very well when you don't have access to a dip belt. Simply grab a dumbbell, make your way to your dip or pullup station, place the handle of the dumbbell against the back of your knee, and bend your leg. Your bent leg will hold the dumbbell in place surprisingly well and you'll have quickly added weight to your body. This method has a limitation, as you can't hold real heavy dumbbells and without a spotter you can only put a dumbbell behind one knee (unless you can float). Regardless, this method will get the job done for most people. I personally recommend switching off which leg is holding the dumbbell with every set to keep things balanced.

    3. Stretching An Anchored Resistance Band - This will definitely be the most rarely seen method. The only person I've ever seen doing it in a gym is myself, to be honest. This method involves anchoring one end of a resistance band with a dumbbell and holding the other end behind your knee or knees like I described with the dumbbell method above. This provides varying resistance throughout each rep. Remember, the higher you lift your body, the more the band will stretch, and the more resistance you'll have to work against. This method is the most involved to set up, gives you the least amount of knowledge on how many pounds you're actually adding to your body, and should be chosen only if methods 1 and 2 above can't be done. Regardless, it does work.

    Here is an example:

    Now, LEVEL UP with any of these three methods!
    Have a coaching, training, nutrition question? PM me!
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