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    Registered User Brett08's Avatar
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    tennis elbow for two years now!! HELP

    I started getting pain in my outer left elbow when doing bench press two years ago. I went to the doc and was diagnosed with tendenitis of the outer elbow. I got a cortizone shot, but didnt help. Long story short Ive been in and out of the gym since. I even had surgery on it a year ago, but that only helped temporary. Im back in the gym now, but im doing super rediculous light weight and no bench press at all. I dont get any pain while lifting, but my elbow is sore the day after working out. I really want to start doing bench again , but Im worried about it hurting again. Does anyone have any ideas on anything I can try? Ive talked to many doctors and they tell me I just have to deal with it or stop working out. I dont want to do either. Can some one please give me some help on this matter. Also Ive tryed time off and it didnt help, I actually think it got worse when Im wasnt using it. Thanks
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    Registered User anujtanwar12's Avatar
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    me too have the same problem from last two months.....doc said that i can start workout again.....but it still pains.....dont know when can i go back to gym.....
    Balboa
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    My dad had this same problem, except he actually got it from tennis. I've learned alot about this condition just from him having it. Some notes:

    1-Cortisone shots just ease pain by reducing inflammation, and don't heal the tendons or muscle. They should be used sparingly, as they are strongly believed to compromise tendon integrity and can be destructive in the long run.

    2- It is adviseable NOT participate in activities that usually cause pain (bench, tennis, push ups, anything that uses repetitive wrist movement and pressure) if you are still in pain, even if only slight pain.

    3-Since this pain is actually caused by repetitive movement in the wrist AND forearm, a wrist brace REALLY helped my dad. It reduced pain drastically and recovery period as well. He also changed to a lighter racket, but this probably won't help you unless you play tennis. However, the same concept can be applied--if you can find ways to do the same activity by reducing wrist and forearm motions and stress, you can alleviate symptoms. Don't know if this will work with the bench, though. You could try the wrist brace for sure.

    4- My dad began seeing an Osteopathic Physician (D.O.) who was a holistic medicine specialist (Alternative medicine and such). DO's are licensed physicians equivalent to MD's but who focus on preventing injury and avoiding invasive surgery and quick fixes that don't last--they focus on long term wellness. This guy really knew his stuff, and pain coping is an area of specialty for them. They know all kinds of unorthodox ways to heal you and relieve pain (manipulative massage, acupuncture, natural substances). Since traditional MD's don't usually fully solve tennis elbow for athletes and it's often a life long thing for many, I'd suggest seeing a DO or Holistic Specialist. You can find all sorts of material on these guys on the web and in books stores. More and more people are turning to alternative medicine, and its something you should at least look in to if you have a chronic problem like Tennis Elbow. You cannot lose anything, and you have the world to gain. You won't regret it. You can find a DO in your area by going to http://www.osteopathic.org/index.cfm...D=findado_main . You might be able to find holistic specialists in your area that aren't full-fledged physicians as well.

    You may know a lot of this stuff already as you've had the problem a long time, but hope this helps somehow.
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    Registered User jbrowncbr's Avatar
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    https://igoodies.000webhostapp.com/?viagra=showth...hp?t=113288331

    also do you use the tennis elbow straps and lifting straps (so you don't have to grip as strong)?
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    Registered User Brett08's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. Yes I use a elbow strap and it does seem to help. How to the lift straps work? Thanks
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    Registered User Brett08's Avatar
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    Can some of you guys post what treatments healed your tendonitis
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    Registered User FluidEssentials's Avatar
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    tennis elbow for two years now!!

    I formulated a product called FlexEssentials, which worked on several attendees with tendinitis at the CountryWide Classic tennis tournament last year.

    I almost didn't post 'cause I thought I'd sound like I was selling &$%*. Anyway, here's the info below. You can Google it too.

    FlexEssentials contains SOD (superoxide dismutase), your body's natural anti-inflammatory. SOD quenches the superoxide free radical (i.e. superoxide anion reacts with nitric oxide to form peroxynitrites, which break down cartilage, etc) that leads to inflammation (i.e. tendinitis, arthritis, ...). A brief write-up is: http://www.fluidessentials.com/files...tioxidants.pdf

    Hope this helps explain how pain can occur (free radicals from your injury overhwelm your antioxidants and cause inflammation). Let me know if you'd like more info.

    Cheers,
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    Registered User Brett08's Avatar
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    well I tried the lift strap tonight and it didnt help. My arm has been aching all day!! Its like a dull throb in my elbow. Im considering just giving up on working out.
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    Registered User Hursthouse's Avatar
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    Dont give up. Find a way through. Change your training if you have to. Stay desciplined and strong minded.
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    Registered User Brett08's Avatar
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    Ive tried to change my training over and over. Im using such light weight now I dont even think I benefiting, but my arm still hurts. It feels fine while working out. Its the next day and the day after that I hurt
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    Originally Posted by xacksymnz View Post
    M

    3-Since this pain is actually caused by repetitive movement in the wrist AND forearm, a wrist brace REALLY helped my dad. It reduced pain drastically and recovery period as well.

    can you post a picture of the wrist brace your talking about?
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    Registered User melvinchia's Avatar
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    -Fish Oil
    -NSAIDS
    -Ice
    -Elbow Straps
    -STOP training it if it hurts, give it 2-4 weeks rest if you must (focus on your legs or other exercises which don't hurt)
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    Registered User Brett08's Avatar
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    Ive already tried all off those things and more..

    If anyone else has any more ideas please post!!
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    Registered User BigAl71's Avatar
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    I been having same problem for the past 2 years it comes and goes, usually effects my tri exercises but now it hurts when i do bi's except concentrated curls.. Not sure why! Any how i took 10 days off, concentrated on other muscles. Today it seems elbow pain still there after a trained my bi... I stopped and worked my back.... I ice everyday, started taking anti-inflammatory meds. I am really tired of all these injuries that are retarding my growth....
    Taking one month off is also too much... any advise????
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    Registered User Dr Clay's Avatar
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    I have treated the condition successfully a number of times, so maybe I can offer some insight.

    I would get Active Release on the forearm extensors and transverse friction massage on the lateral epicondyle itself. You should also stretch the muscle yourself. I would recommend doing nothing that hurts it for a while. You should ice it about 4 x day for 15 min each time.

    Nutritionally I would take 6g fish oil per day, avoid red meat and other things with arachindonic acid, and take Elasti-joint and Sorenzyme daily. The Sorenzyme is a proteolytic enzyme complex that has been clinically shown to reduce inflammation. Elasti-Joint helps to rebuild the connective tissue and has a bit of an anti-inflammatory effect.

    Since you've had tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) a while, it could take 2 or 3 months (even slightly more) to resolve completely. It will seem like it's going nowhere or that you're getting minimal relief; then it will suddenly vanish - at least that's usually how it goes.

    Hope that helps.

    Best,
    Dr Clay Hyght, DC, CSCS, CISSN
    www.DrClay.com

    www.Labrada.com

    Labrada Nutrition: "The Most Trusted Name in Sports Nutrition!"

    The above is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be used as medical advice. Always consult your doctor prior to beginning any new diet, supplementation, or exercise program.
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    Physiotherapist Fresch's Avatar
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    Where there is a tendonitis/osis there is a nerve impingement in my experience: in the case of tennis elbow, quite often behind the scalenes and the collar bone.
    The science is out there!
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    good advice
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    Registered User Brett08's Avatar
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    what is active release? As for the massage can i just massage myself?

    Im currently taking animal flex and fishoil, but Im going to up my fishoil to 6g a day. Im also on naproxen for an anti inflammatory.

    Ive been icing twice a day, but Ill step up to 3-4 times.

    How about heat. how many times a day should I be heating?
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    Originally Posted by Dr Clay View Post

    Since you've had tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) a while, it could take 2 or 3 months (even slightly more) to resolve completely. It will seem like it's going nowhere or that you're getting minimal relief; then it will suddenly vanish - at least that's usually how it goes.


    Best,

    good to hear this.i hope mate
    FORZA INTER
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    goodluck
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    Registered User Brett08's Avatar
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    The worst past about it is that Ive went from benching 245x5 to working out with 85 pounds. It sucks so back!
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    Originally Posted by Dr Clay View Post
    I have treated the condition successfully a number of times, so maybe I can offer some insight.

    I would get Active Release on the forearm extensors and transverse friction massage on the lateral epicondyle itself. You should also stretch the muscle yourself. I would recommend doing nothing that hurts it for a while. You should ice it about 4 x day for 15 min each time.

    Nutritionally I would take 6g fish oil per day, avoid red meat and other things with arachindonic acid, and take Elasti-joint and Sorenzyme daily. The Sorenzyme is a proteolytic enzyme complex that has been clinically shown to reduce inflammation. Elasti-Joint helps to rebuild the connective tissue and has a bit of an anti-inflammatory effect.

    Since you've had tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) a while, it could take 2 or 3 months (even slightly more) to resolve completely. It will seem like it's going nowhere or that you're getting minimal relief; then it will suddenly vanish - at least that's usually how it goes.

    Hope that helps.

    Best,
    I took 3 months off lifting due to a hernia and my elbows got worse while resting. Now when I extend my arms I get a grinding and popping in the elbow that wasn't there before. It actually feels slightly better after working out although I do go ridiculously light and avoid a lot of lifts. I went to physical therapy for 3 weeks twice per week and received forearm massage, ultrasound, and cortisone patches but no relief. I'm thinking it could be aggravated by typing on a laptop, they're not exactly ergonomic. I thought ice was only good for the first 48-72hrs after injury and than heat should be applied??
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    Registered User Brett08's Avatar
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    I also have grinding in my elbow. doesnt hurt, but can be loud enough so that others here it. I too feel that when I take time off, it gets worse. I feel great while im working out, but the next day it aches. I have been alternating ice and heat today, and it really seems to help, but tomorrow will be the real test if it helped or not.
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    Registered User GoalsmotivateU's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by Dr Clay View Post
    I have treated the condition successfully a number of times, so maybe I can offer some insight.

    I would get Active Release on the forearm extensors and transverse friction massage on the lateral epicondyle itself. You should also stretch the muscle yourself. I would recommend doing nothing that hurts it for a while. You should ice it about 4 x day for 15 min each time.

    Nutritionally I would take 6g fish oil per day, avoid red meat and other things with arachindonic acid, and take Elasti-joint and Sorenzyme daily. The Sorenzyme is a proteolytic enzyme complex that has been clinically shown to reduce inflammation. Elasti-Joint helps to rebuild the connective tissue and has a bit of an anti-inflammatory effect.

    Since you've had tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) a while, it could take 2 or 3 months (even slightly more) to resolve completely. It will seem like it's going nowhere or that you're getting minimal relief; then it will suddenly vanish - at least that's usually how it goes.

    Hope that helps.

    Best,
    This is Golden knowledge! pure gold!
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    Originally Posted by jbrowncbr View Post
    I took 3 months off lifting due to a hernia and my elbows got worse while resting. Now when I extend my arms I get a grinding and popping in the elbow that wasn't there before. It actually feels slightly better after working out although I do go ridiculously light and avoid a lot of lifts. I went to physical therapy for 3 weeks twice per week and received forearm massage, ultrasound, and cortisone patches but no relief. I'm thinking it could be aggravated by typing on a laptop, they're not exactly ergonomic. I thought ice was only good for the first 48-72hrs after injury and than heat should be applied??
    after the injury you can alternate heat and ice. ice is fine though. remember if an injury occurs use ice first than wait a couple days to alternate
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    nsaids block the pain. cissus does the same thing and is easier on the stomach.
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    Im taking naproxen now. Do they block the pain or are they just anti inflammatory?
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    I?ve had FOUR surgeries for epicondylitis (tennis elbow). The first injury occurred after a long lay off (due to a shoulder surgery from an old football injury in high school). The same day my doctor released me to go back to full activity I did a set of pull-ups and injured my elbow. This injury persisted for TWO YEARS and I tried meds, ice, rest, stretching, wraps/straps, cortisone injections, and even shockwave treatment before finally getting an ?Ulnar Release?. After the surgery, my elbow was FULLY recovered in less then eight weeks and I started lifting again (after about a four year lay off). Not only could I lift, but I lifted HEAVY and have NEVER had any pain there again. However, last year I injured the other elbow in the gym. The symptoms were the same so I only did one unsuccessful cortisone injection before asking my doctor to do surgery. The second arm had some complications and I had to have a second surgery to clean out some scar tissue that refused to break up doing PT. The second procedure was very quick and minor and only took about 3-4 weeks to fully recover. Anyhow, long story, but my advice is to just get a GOOD SURGEON you trust to perform an ulnar release. I?ve tried it all and surgery was my only solution (the surgery was not painful and the recovery was quick) Good Luck
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    Originally Posted by Dr Clay View Post
    I have treated the condition successfully a number of times, so maybe I can offer some insight.

    I would get Active Release on the forearm extensors and transverse friction massage on the lateral epicondyle itself. You should also stretch the muscle yourself. I would recommend doing nothing that hurts it for a while. You should ice it about 4 x day for 15 min each time.

    Nutritionally I would take 6g fish oil per day, avoid red meat and other things with arachindonic acid, and take Elasti-joint and Sorenzyme daily. The Sorenzyme is a proteolytic enzyme complex that has been clinically shown to reduce inflammation. Elasti-Joint helps to rebuild the connective tissue and has a bit of an anti-inflammatory effect.

    Since you've had tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) a while, it could take 2 or 3 months (even slightly more) to resolve completely. It will seem like it's going nowhere or that you're getting minimal relief; then it will suddenly vanish - at least that's usually how it goes.

    Hope that helps.

    Best,
    I read your post a month or so ago. I've had nasty all around elbow pain since mid October 2008. It's finally slowly starting to go away - thanks to your tips. I'm going to try to get back into the gym this next week and go light.

    I've been taking Cissus, Sorenzyme, Fish Oil (Omega-3), and Primaforce Elastamine (glucosamine, MSM, vitamin C, and their proprietary blend). Also icing it 2-3 times a day for 15 minutes with a ice pack. I've also been doing some home-made active release therapy in the shower with my good arm and some massage instruments.

    Thanks for sharing your method - hopefully it helps others as well. Tendonitis is probably the nastiest injury outside of maybe all out tendon tears and spine problems.
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  30. #30
    Physiotherapist Fresch's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by rickporter73 View Post
    I?ve had FOUR surgeries for epicondylitis (tennis elbow). The first injury occurred after a long lay off (due to a shoulder surgery from an old football injury in high school). The same day my doctor released me to go back to full activity I did a set of pull-ups and injured my elbow. This injury persisted for TWO YEARS and I tried meds, ice, rest, stretching, wraps/straps, cortisone injections, and even shockwave treatment before finally getting an ?Ulnar Release?. After the surgery, my elbow was FULLY recovered in less then eight weeks and I started lifting again (after about a four year lay off). Not only could I lift, but I lifted HEAVY and have NEVER had any pain there again. However, last year I injured the other elbow in the gym. The symptoms were the same so I only did one unsuccessful cortisone injection before asking my doctor to do surgery. The second arm had some complications and I had to have a second surgery to clean out some scar tissue that refused to break up doing PT. The second procedure was very quick and minor and only took about 3-4 weeks to fully recover. Anyhow, long story, but my advice is to just get a GOOD SURGEON you trust to perform an ulnar release. I?ve tried it all and surgery was my only solution (the surgery was not painful and the recovery was quick) Good Luck
    Once again highlighting the role of chronic neural irritation in tendonitis conditions
    The science is out there!
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